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Many States Have No Headache Specialists

June 27, 2013

Featuring: Dr. Noah Rosen, Director, Headache Center at North Shore-LIJ's Cushing Neuroscience Institute

BOSTON, Massachusetts — As patients with headache living in Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Carolina, and Wyoming probably already know, there's not a single certified headache specialist practicing anywhere in those states.

The picture is brighter, however, in Washington, DC, New Hampshire, New York, and Nebraska, which have much higher rates of headache specialists.

Noah Rosen, MD, director, Headache Center, Cushing Neuroscience Institute, New York, hopes that his new study, which uncovered specialist shortages across the United States, will highlight the problem of lack of funding for training programs. "We need more recognition for a condition that's more common than asthma and diabetes combined."

The study will presented here during the 2013 International Headache Congress (IHC).

Disease of Morbidity
Migraine affects 11.8% of the general US population aged 12 years and up. That translates into 30.6 million patients with migraine and 2.4 million with chronic migraine.

For the study, Dr. Rosen and his colleagues located all United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties (UCNS) headache specialists geographically and compared that information to demographic data on state populations.

As of 2012, there were 416 UCNS headache specialists practicing in the United States. Six states had no headache specialists at all, while 8 had only 1 and 5 had only 2.

The shortage problem, which appears to be rooted in a lack of government-funded training programs that has resulted in an "extremely limited number of fellowship positions," said Dr. Rosen, could get even worse as experts predict a future physician shortage.

"Neurologists in particular will have an even greater percentage of the expected shortage in the next 10 years, and given the few fellowship training programs that allow people to be trained in headache, there will be even a greater shortage of headache specialists."

 

 

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